Artificial Vision

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  • vOICe Artificial Vision System vision technology for the totally blind.
  • NovaVision VRT: Vision Restoration Therapy addressing vision loss after stroke, traumatic brain injury (TBI), or optic nerve injury
  • Tasting the Light: Device Lets the Blind "See" with Their Tongues A pair of sunglasses wired to an electric "lollipop" helps the visually impaired regain optical sensations through a different pathway.
  • Tongue Display Unit (TDU) for electrotactile spatiotemporal pattern presentation Download the Tounge Display Unit paper (.pdf)
  • FDA Approves BrainPort, Device Which Allows Blind To "See" With Tongue: Re-Teaching The Brain To Overcome Disabilities [VIDEO]. The BrainPort V100 is a square, battery-powered plastic lollipop connected to a pair of sunglasses. The sunglasses have a tiny video camera mounted on one of the lenses that captures images of objects surrounding the wearer. The images are then converted into electrical impulses that are sent to electrodes in the lollipop. When the lollipop is put on the tongue, these impulses can be felt as vibrations, which the brain then interprets to give the wearer the size, shape, and position of objects nearby for a better awareness of their surroundings.

    When a person loses a sense, either from birth or injury, their brain develops new neural pathways to compensate for the disability. For example, if a person's eyesight is unbalanced, they may see flat surfaces as being slanted. The brain's plasticity readjusts the horizontal plane with new neural pathways that correct the balance. The BrainPort V100 retrains the brain to help the wearer navigate around objects and barriers.

  • BrainPort Vision Pro. The new BrainPort Vision Pro is a 2nd generation oral electronic vision aid that provides electro-tactile stimulation to aid profoundly blind patients in orientation, mobility, and object recognition as an adjunctive device to other assistive methods such as the white cane or a guide dog.  Updated

Mental Health

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