Plain language bill in U.S. Senate is being stalled

Last updated: March 3, 2015

Note:  All links going to other websites will open in the same window. Use the Back button to return to our site.

You might be able to help.

Whitney Quesenbery brought us the latest news about the Plain Language bill that we wrote about back in April this year.

It is stuck in the Senate. Senator Bennett (R. Utah) has blocked the bill on the grounds that it would be a problem for the Federal Election Commission and the Election Assistance Commission.

Whitney has two simple answers to their objections:

  1. The law does not apply to regulations
  2. Are they really suggesting that information about elections should be hard to understand

If you are in the United States, you can help by writing or calling your Senator's office and Senator Bennett's office to express your opinion.

Here's additional information from the International Law Prof Blog about how to write your representative on this matter:
Plain Language in Government Communication

Dr. X’s Free Associations

Last updated: July 18, 2016

Note:  All links going to other websites will open in the same window. Use the Back button to return to our site.

An example of free association is finding an unexpected gem while searching the Web for something else. While searching for photos of Washington, DC, I discovered a very interesting blog about psychology, neuroscience, vintage photos, Web-based testing, and lots more. The blog is called Dr. X's Free Associations [No longer available as of 17jul16]. Dr. X is a clinical psychologist who blogs about old photos, psychology & psychoanalysis, science, and more.

Today's post is titled "Psychology, Mind & Neuroscience Roundup" has a collection of interesting links. On the 27th, his post "Woman Recovers Balance Using Tongue" presents a video report about how the late Paul Bach-y-Rita used sensory substitution and applied the same principle to the development of devices for visual and hearing impairments to help a woman regain her balance. Followed by "A Researcher's Thoughts on Web-based Experiments" on cognition and language.

I hope you enjoy losing yourself in this blog as much as I have. It also has a collection of other related blogs in the sidebars. And, of course, those drx.typepad.com vintage photos.

Braille Resources

Last updated: May 22, 2016

Note:  All links going to other websites will open in the same window. Use the Back button to return to our site.

  • About Braille from the National Braille Press (NBP). If your child or student is blind, you may be wondering whether or not they need to learn braille. Read on to find out more about how braille works, why it's important, and where to find braille resources.
  • The Braille Bug The American Foundation for the Blind (AFB) created the Braille Bug web site to teach sighted children about braille, and to encourage literacy among all children.
  • Braille Displays:
    • Blind and Low Vision Products AbleData's database of products for people with visual disabilities. Major Categories: Computers, Educational Aids, Health Care, Information Storage, Kitchen Aids, Labeling, Magnification, Office Equipment, Orientation and Mobility, Reading, Recreation, Sensors, Telephones, Time, Tools, Travel, Typing, Writing (Braille).
  • Duxbury Systems leads the world in software for braille. The Duxbury Braille Translator (DBT) and MegaDots, are used by virtually all of the world's leading braille publishers. No one supports more languages than Duxbury Systems — DBT supports grade 1 and grade 2 translation for over 130 languages. The software can produce contracted and uncontracted braille, mathematics, and technical braille.
  • Enabling Technologies manufacturing Braille Embossers for over 43 years.
  • Humanware – Blindness products makers of the BrailleNote and BrailleNote PK, screen readers, embossers, reading machines talking GPS, and other items for blind, low vision, deaf/blind communication solutions.
  • Unified English Braille (UEB) is an English language Braille code standard, developed to permit representing the wide variety of literary and technical material in use in the English-speaking world today, in uniform fashion. From Wikipedia.
  • U.S. National Library Service (NLS) Factsheets: Web-Braille