Sports and Recreation


  • ATVs:
    • All-Terrain Vehicle Safety by the United States Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC). All-Terrain Vehicles (ATVs) are among the most popular recreational vehicles in the nation today, but along with popularity comes increased risk and sometimes carelessness.
      • ATV Safety Institute
      • Motorcycle Safety by the U.S. Department of Transportation. (NHTSA). "Born to be wild" may be an anthem for a generation of motorcycles enthusiasts but the accident rates are a sobering reminder that there's more to riding than the romance of the open road.
      • Snowmobiling Safety by the International Snowmobile Manufacturers Association (ISMA). Make sure you get back to the lodge safely.
      • Safe Riders! Snowmobile Safety Awareness Program. This program has been produced through a partnership between the American Council of Snowmobile Associations (ACSA), the International Association of Snowmobile Administrators (IASA), and the International Snowmobile Manufacturers Association (ISMA) with financial assistance from the Recreational Trails Program administered by the U.S. Department of Transportation — Federal Highway Administration (FHWA).
  • Accessible Gaming
    • AbleGamers Charity Combating Social Isolation Through Play. Creates opportunities that enable play in order to combat social isolation, foster inclusive communities, and improve the quality of life for people with disabilities. Get Help. Give Help.
    • Accessible Gaming Quarterly. Accessible Gaming Quarterly is a zine devoted to accessibility and disability within the tabletop RPG space. Each issue features articles and art by disabled contributors, but the zine isn't only for people with disabilities. It's full of articles designed to bring together disabled and non-disabled gamers alike.
    • The Secret World of Disabled Gamers | MIT Technology Review. By Emerging Technology from the arXivarchive page, July 3, 2018. By some estimates, as many as 2.6 billion people take part in digital gaming, a significant fraction of the global population. There is much ongoing study by games makers and researchers into why and how people play: for fun, for the challenge, to relax, to engage with friends, and so on. And yet one group of people are conspicuous by their absence in this research: people with disabilities. There is growing anecdotal evidence that many disabled people enjoy gaming and are increasingly involved in it. But little is known about who these people are, what games they play, and what challenges they face. And that is a significant barrier to improving access for the disabled.
    • Can I Play That? is a hobby site to a destination for players and developers alike that provides all forms of accessibility information on video games and the industry. Reviews, news stories, and features at CIPT exclusively report on the ever-growing presence and adoption of accessibility features within the gaming industry. Can I Play That? works to share stories that influence game updates, inform disabled players, educate and entertain players and developers, and provide a voice for one of the largest player bases in the industry. They have also developed professional workshops that tackle topics such as diversity, equity, and inclusion, and accessible community management. These workshops are available for studios to book.
    • The Rise of Accessible Gaming
    • How game-makers are catering to disabled players Hardware and software solutions open gaming to a wider audience than ever. By Meagan Shelley, 8/29/2021, 5:20 PM. (Download the PDF.)
    • The Conversation, It's designers who can make gaming more accessible for people living with disabilities, Published: January 17, 2019 2.13pm EST, By Ben Egliston, PhD candidate in Media and Communications, University of Sydney. (Download the PDF.)
    • Combating Social Isolation Through Play
    • Cerebral Palsy Foundation (CPF) Accessible Gaming. CPF worked with Microsoft to develop the Xbox Adaptive Controller that let's us all play Xbox!
    • "Game accessibility" article by Wikipedia
  • Disability Sports:

Accessible Travel

Don't be Afraid to Step out of Your Comfort Zone and Travel

Crossing the Border

TSA Tips for Traveling with Visible and Invisible Disabilities

Those of us with invisible disabilities know how humiliating the TSA checkpoint can be and a long wait in line can build your pain level to much higher levels. I can identify with the terrible experience had by Brittany Quinn that she documents in her post TSA Agent Kruze: "Was the surgery worth the pain?". Hopefully her formal complaint to the TSA and the DoHS succeeded in getting better training for the TSA agents. Since then some improvements have been made that can help you. Before your trip:

  1. Apply for a TSA PreCheck membership: good for 5 years and is renewable, fee is $85, spend less time in line, you do not have to remove your shoes, light jackets, belts, 3-1-1 liquids, or laptops. You can apply online and get an appointment at your local airport or a TSA enrollment center to have a 10-minute background check and be fingerprinted.
  2. Download and print out the Disability Notification Card, fill in your disability, and present it to the TSA agent at the checkpoint.
  3. Contact TSA 72 hours in advance: TSA Cares hotline at 1-855-787-2227 or email hidden; JavaScript is required The TSA Cares program can provide a TSA agent to escort the traveler through the airport and assist in the screening process. You can also ask them for advice if you will be travelling with medical supplies.
  4. Contact the airline 72 hours in advance about your disability needs. Some airports can provide you with an advocate when you check in who will go through security with you.

Tips about Air Travel if you are Blind

Another frequent traveler is Tom Babinszki, who was born blind. Tom has a passion for travel and blogs on his website Even Grounds about traveling the world. It is not so easy when you are blind but it is not impossible. In his blog he shares his experiences and provides some tips for blind travelers. His latest post in February 2020 is "Air Travel", in which he describes getting around the airport, going through security checkpoints, waiting at the gate, and entertaining yourself during the flight.

TSA Tips for Traveling with Medical Supplies

Air Travel and the TSA

  • TSA Disability Notification Card: Individuals with Disabilities and Medical Conditions (.pdf) Fill in your disability, print the card, and present it to the TSA agent before going through a security checkpoint
  • Tips from the Feeding Tube Awareness Foundation for disabled passengers at TSA checkpoints:
    • Get a travel letter from your doctor explaining your medical condition. Also make sure to document all the medical supplies and equipment you will be traveling with. This can assist you through security and act as a form of advocacy. See the Sample Travel Letter for Feeding Tube and IV Consumers page for sample letter.
    • Talk to your homecare company. It's possible they can deliver supplies right to your destination so you don't need to travel with it. This save you the hassle of lugging heavy equipment and avoids the difficulty of getting through security.
  • Aviation Consumer Protection U.S. Department of Transportation
  • U.S. Department of Transportation Toll-Free Hotline for air travelers with disabilities:
    • TSA Cares hotline: 1-855-787-2227
    • Voice: 1-800-778-4838
    • TTY: 1-800-455-9880

    The Hotline is available from 7 a.m. to 11 p.m. Eastern Standard Time, seven days a week. It serves two main purposes: (1) education and (2) assistance in resolving disability-related air travel problems.

  • Air travelers who have a disability-related issue must submit their complaint in writing using the
    Air Travel Complaint – Comment Form of the U.S. Department of Transportation, or

    By postal mail to:

    Aviation Consumer Protection Division
    U.S. Department of Transportation
    400 7th Street, S.W.
    Washington, D.C. 20590

    By email to: by e-mail at email hidden; JavaScript is required

  • Wheelchair Users' Guide to Air Travel
  • New Guidelines Debunk "Economy Class Syndrome"  Updated

Lost Luggage

Train Travel

Car Travel

Emergency Evacuation and Traveler's Services

  • Traveler’s Emergency Network (TEN) an international membership organization dedicated to providing the best travel assistance services for a low annual membership fee: 24 hour access to medical experts, emergency evacuation, repatriation home after stabilization, transportation home for dependents, return of mortal remains, Seven Corners International, and many other travel benefits.
  • Fire Safety for Wheelchair Users (.pdf)

Travel Destinations

Encouragement and Guides