Color Blindness Aids

  • Five Best Color Blindness Correction Glasses for 2020 rated and explained by BestViews.  New
  • Treatment For Your Color Blindness With Glasses for Color Blindness and Color Corrective Glasses  New
  • American Printing House for the Blind The American Printing House for the Blind (APH) is the world's largest nonprofit organization creating educational, workplace, and independent living products and services for people who are visually impaired.
  • ChromaGen™ Europe, worldwide producer and supplier of lenses for color blindness and dyslexia. ChromaGen™ is patented, trademarked and FDA Cleared. The patented diagnostic system is used by trained professionals for the management of Academic Skills Disorder (ASD™). ASD™ is an umbrella term that includes dyslexia, color deficiency, dyspraxia (lack of coordination; clumsiness), and other learning related difficulties. In some cases, ChromaGen has also been known to help migraine sufferers. ChromaGen is a system of eight colored haploscopic filters of a known density and color hue which, when prescribed to sufferers of ASD™, has been proven to improve these disorders.
  • ColorView Glasses, Imagine a world with faded colors. You may already be experiencing vision in a world where some colors are confusing. Although there is no cure, there is a solution – ColorView® lenses. Some complimentary colors might be difficult to distinguish for some people. These symptoms may be caused by congenital red-green color vision deficiency.
  • Visolve, is the software tool that transforms colors of the computer display into the discriminable colors for various people including people with color vision deficiency, commonly called color blindness. In addition to the color conversion, it also has color filtering and hatching capabilities.
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The Web Diva for the Accessible Techcomm website since 2012. Fellow of the Society for Technical Communication. STC member since June 1979. A founder and former webmaster for the STC Special Needs Committee, which became the STC AccessAbility SIG (2001-2011).